The mining industry seeks reducing risk exposure as well as increasing efficiency and productivity through the whole mining process and over all types of machinery. To do so, the industry follows various initiatives of improving existing measures and tools, such as smart sensors, condition monitoring systems, on-board assistance systems, or implementing new technologies, like autonomous operations and robotics etc. Most of the measures are understood to be related to IoT (Internet of Things) or IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things).

Almost all players in mining industry follow the implementation of IoT related operations, products and services. To name a few: Rio Tinto established “The mine of the futureTM” in 2008 implementing intelligent tools and a remote operations center for autonomous operations in Perth, Australia; Anglo American introduced autonomous drills in underground mining as part of their FutureSmart MiningTM. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), like Caterpillar and Komatsu or Sandvik, Epiroc and Metso, or service companies developed data driven and connected devices, including smart sensors, to generate and utilize data.

However, all of the cited initiatives share the same shortcomings: They do not source the full potential of available data and cannot be integrated into other solutions, unconditionally. In general, digitalization initiatives are currently creating data silos instead of leveraging all available data to the fullest. Creating a global approach which generates the highest possible benefit for all data producers and users is the only way to overcome innovation barriers. Such barriers have been identified to be amongst the leading issues mining industry is facing, nowadays. Combined with the fact that 3 out of 4 IoT projects fail to generate benefit to the implementing entity, it becomes obvious that a major change in the way digitalization is practiced is overdue.

The mining industry seeks reducing risk exposure as well as increasing efficiency and productivity through the whole mining process and over all types of machinery. To do so, the industry follows various initiatives of improving existing measures and tools, such as smart sensors, condition monitoring systems, on-board assistance systems, or implementing new technologies, like autonomous operations and robotics etc. Most of the measures are understood to be related to IoT (Internet of Things) or IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things).

Almost all players in mining industry follow the implementation of IoT related operations, products and services. To name a few: Rio Tinto established “The mine of the futureTM” in 2008 implementing intelligent tools and a remote operations center for autonomous operations in Perth, Australia; Anglo American introduced autonomous drills in underground mining as part of their FutureSmart MiningTM. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), like Caterpillar and Komatsu or Sandvik, Epiroc and Metso, or service companies developed data driven and connected devices, including smart sensors, to generate and utilize data.

However, all of the cited initiatives share the same shortcomings: They do not source the full potential of available data and cannot be integrated into other solutions, unconditionally. In general, digitalization initiatives are currently creating data silos instead of leveraging all available data to the fullest. Creating a global approach which generates the highest possible benefit for all data producers and users is the only way to overcome innovation barriers. Such barriers have been identified to be amongst the leading issues mining industry is facing, nowadays. Combined with the fact that 3 out of 4 IoT projects fail to generate benefit to the implementing entity, it becomes obvious that a major change in the way digitalization is practiced is overdue.